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A
 Chronological 
Listing
 of
 Early
 Weather
 Events
#1
A
 Chronological 
Listing
 of
 Early
 Weather
 Events

6th Edition

James
 A.
 Marusek

EXCERPT:

Introduction

The first mercury thermometer was invented in 1714 A.D. The barometer was invented in 1643 A.D.This opened up a completely new scientific realm. Weather observations grew into the science of meteorology. One of the early American meteorologists was Charles Peirce. He meticulously recorded temperatures at three set times per day for a span exceeding 50 years.
In 1847,his weather data was published in A Meteorological Account of the Weather in Philadelphia from January 1, 1790 to January 1 1847.1 Additionally,
this book also contained supplementary chapters that included a chronology of
early accounts of abnormal weather observations throughout the world.
This weather chronology began over 1,800 years ago.I have combined and organized these accounts in chronological order.

The book by Charles Peirce was the initial source of the material used in this
work. All other works cited are note numbered.Because this chronology begins almost eighteen hundred years ago, part of the purpose of including other references was to compare them against Pierce’s chronology.Examples are the freezing of the Black Sea in 762 A.D., the heavy rainstorms in Great Britain in (553 A.D., 918 A.D.,1222 A.D., 1233 A.D., 1330 A.D., 1338 A.D., and 1348 A.D.),and
the winters in which the RiverThames froze in London.

At least that was the original intent! But as I delved deeper into validating the chronology given by Charles Peirce, I came across so many other different
but complementary chronologies, I just found it hard to resist the desire of combining them into a greater global weather chronology.As a result,I just let this
work go where it may and I followed.

1103 page PDF
It is our attitude toward free thought and free expression that will determine our fate. There must be no limit on the range of temperate discussion, no limits on thought. No subject must be taboo. No censor must preside at our assemblies.

–William O. Douglas, U.S. Supreme Court Justice, 1952
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